Installing Tomcat on Mac OSX (Snow Leopard)

Complete fresher here, and I guess there might be guys out there in the same boat. Here are the steps I needed to go through to make it work. Following some pointers on the way there:

Start by downloading what we need from http://tomcat.apache.org/.

For the latest version see the Which version , but I used 6.x and got the core zip.

After you have downloaded it , most likely to the downloads folder unpack it and rename the folder to Tomcat for simplicity

Copy the complete folder to $$your_profile$$/Library

After you have done this , and got stuck here for a bit, run the following command to enable you to execute the commands from terminal.

chmod a+x /users/$your_profile$/library/tomcat/bin/*.sh

If you don’t expect to see the following:

Peter-Versters-MacBook-Pro:~ Peter$ /users/peter/Library/Tomcat/bin/startup.sh

-bash: /users/peter/Library/Tomcat/bin/startup.sh: Permission denied

This will make the files writeable and allow you to start the service.

Then execute the following:

/users/peter/$your_profile$/Tomcat/bin/startup.sh

Provided you are still with me navigate to http://localhost:8080 to test if the services is running.

Final step to give you admin access to the site:

is to set up the users as per the following:

conf/tomcat-users.xml in your installation. That file will contain the credentials to let you use this webapp.

You will need to add manager role to the config file listed above. For example:

<role rolename="manager"/>
<user username="tomcat" password="s3cret" roles="manager"/>
Happy Tomcatting...

Cisco taking on SharePoint

In case you missed it, Cisco took the wraps off its social/collaboration strategy yesterday at its Collaboration Summit (#ciscocollab) summit in San Francisco. Cisco fired a salvo deep into the territory of Microsoft and IBM Lotus (and to a lesser extent, Google) with its own suite of products covering messaging and social computing. Cisco also introduced numerous video and real-time collaboration products designed to broaden access to its telepresence suite, mate video with WebEx web conferencing, and easily enable inter-company collaboration.

On the social/messaging front, Cisco introduced the following new products:

Cisco Pulse – An on-premise applications that analyzes messaging, tags, content, and e-mail to essentially create an internal cloud tag for users, groups, or the entire organization. Cisco’s markets Pulse as allowing you to “Take the Pulse” of your organization. Pulse is an embedded application into Cisco’s new Media Engine platform.
Enterprise Collaboration Platform – Maybe not the greatest name, but this is Cisco’s SharePoint/Connections killer. Not only does it provide the shared workspace and collaboration capabilities of others, but Cisco embeds voice and video sharing and integrates personal profiles into other communication application. Essentially ECP could become the ultimate user portal, allowing workers to manage all their communications and collaboration through their home page.
Show and Share – this is a video editing and content management application. The “killer app” is that it can split the audio track from a video, and then transcribe the voice track into text so it becomes searchable. Users can view video by looking at transcript and only watching the parts they want. This also runs on Media Engine. The user interface is similar to iMovie, and users can easily take their own videos (that Cisco hopes you will create with its Flip camera), edit them, but in chapter markers, and publish to their communities.
Cisco WebEx Mail – A SaaS service based on their PostPath acquisition. WebEx mail supports a rich AJAX-based web client, or existing Outlook clients, as well as any mobile device that supports ActiveSync (or BlackBerry BES). Cisco is offering a 25 GB mailbox, arguing that WebEx mail will enable administrators and users to end the pain of PST files, especially as video drives larger and larger mailbox sizes. WebEx mail provides in-the-cloud security as well.
In addition to all of these announcements, Cisco introduced a new UC client (on-prem, or hosted as a WebEx product) and new options for cross-company federation for video and presence (see the posts over on No Jitter for more details.)

Now comes the questions: What’s the go-to-market strategy? How do they provide support? How do they build a developer community? How do they differentiate themselves from Microsoft, IBM (and SocialText and Jive)? What’s the ROI? How do you integrate legacy applications or even potentially federate between Cisco and Microsoft collaboration applications? All these and more to be asked, and hopefully answered over the next 2 days. [From Enterprise 2.0 Blog » Blog Archive » Hi Everyone, Cisco Is Here]

What is SharePoint ?

Having been priviledged enough to attend the second SharePoint conference this year and given the opportunity to see both Bill Gates and Steve Ballmer deliver the keynotes at these two events, one point became very clear. What is SharePoint? I have known the answer to this for some time and pleasantly surprised when Steve Ballmer did not have an answer to this that impressed me. It took to long for him to get the point across and by the time he did I had lost my will to live.

The point being that the CEO of Microsoft did not have the words to properly define his best selling product, where do we as mere mortals and sales people even start with this concept that at every release seem to consume more and more functionality and products under the banner of SharePoint.

Well I’m pleased to say that Steve’s lieutenants did not have difficulty in bringing the point across. The answer is pretty simple really. It is an Information Operating System. This might make it easier to help identify the types of problems customers currently have and can be suitably resolved on the SharePoint Platform

SharePoint can be viewed in two primary dimensions:

SharePoint as a Product

One as a product where the opportunities are broadly speaking directly related product core features. An example of this might be Document Management, Records Management, Search etc. These types of solutions often find themselves competing with best of breed products, and when compared on this basis more often than not it seems to be a relatively costly competitor. Depending on your licensing arrangements in place.

The following often misleading concept is that of using SharePoint product features and finding that they have shortcomings. Primarily this could be attributed to the design principles of the product not to be a best of breed but to provide a stable platform for building these types of solutions on top of.

These gaps are filled by ISVs focusing on a variety of areas including disaster recovery, migration and functional enhancements such as CRM and Project Management to name but a few. Considering al of these elements when evaluating the suitability of SharePoint for your needs will help inform your decision.

When extending the scope of the implementation you may indeed find that better ROI can be achieved, the following section considers this viewpoint.

SharePoint as a Platform

When we see SharePoint as the Information Operating System the opportunities are endless. Consider the Windows Platform, can we truly begin to name the number of solutions built on it each with a specific need and each with a set of requirements defined by a segment of the market that created the demand. These applications all have one thing in common, without the capabilities of the Operating System it would be impossible to build these in a cost effective fashion as each product would have to build their own mechanism of instructing the hardware on the appropriate instructions.

When taking into account the common elements that the applications in your organisation currently have and how many those are duplicated. Not only on the same platform but also across other platforms. Now consider the time and effort it took to construct these application features and add to that the overhead of managing them on a daily basis. Considering these elements to inform the design of single platform for implementation of enterprise wide applications might yield more returns than can be imagined. Simple and easy, however we should not under estimate the time and effort to get to this “nirvana”.

It does help to take step back and define clearly the objectives , formulate a strategy and subsequently a migration plan. Keeping all implementations aligned with benefits realisation against a Clearly Defined Business Case.

SharePoint_Business_Value.jpg


Free Microsoft Open Source Content Management

Microsoft is working on a set of free open-source content-management application and set of reusable components for it that is codenamed “Orchard.”

The company is slated to share details about its plans for Orchard at TechEd Europe next week.

I asked Microsoft officials for more information on Orchard and got back a no comment.

But here’s what is known so far about the project, courtesy of the session write-up from the TechEd site: [From Free Microsoft open-source content management app to get its debut next week | All about Microsoft | ZDNet.com]

How to write technical documentation

This is absolutely brilliant. If only we could all use this approach.

Jeff Moser has written an excellent article describing how the Advanced Encryption Standard works. He uses an very accessible paradigm – the cartoon. He layers the description starting with a simple overview and progressively getting into more and more detail. Because the story is layered, it is complete at each stage before more detail is added. The audience has the opportunity to leave when they know enough.

[From How to write technical documentation...]

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